Traveler Spotlight: Patrick Gooing / “How I Left Hollywood to Work in Sydney’s Film Industry”

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Stack dat cheese!
Patrick Gooing has been a close friend of mine since freshman year of college and he is a very talented film, TV and documentary producer.

PATRICK:

Upon graduating from film school, I had already interned at multiple production companies in both film and television in Los Angeles. I knew I wanted to produce and fully commit to my career in film, but I wasn’t ready to settle and plant my feet in LA until I had tried something a little daring and outside the box first.

 

So…I said f*ck it – I decided to move to Australia! Honestly, the way I looked at it, I had nothing to lose – I didn’t have a job, a girlfriend, or any other obligations, and the worst I could do is fail. I knew gaining international contacts and relationships in a foreign film industry would be invaluable and would help me stand out when/if I returned back to the states. Also, Champion was already living in Sydney and he assured me that Australia’s economy was Re-Donkulously better than ours. He said finding a regular job that pays better than most mid-level business jobs in the states would be easy to find. SERIOUSLY, I got a job working at a telemarketing agency making $27 after taxes with two days of looking – HA!

 

So I gathered as many contacts as I could from my colleagues in LA, and I prepared to make my move. It’s crazy when you realize what it takes to move to a foreign country when you have no idea if you’ll ever move back. I had to cancel my cell service, modify my credit cards, and I had to obtain Australia health insurance– which really paid off (I’ll get to that later).

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My documentary filmmaking experience in India was mind-blowing.

 

Right before I was about to buy my ticket, my friend Mike Tacca asked me to produce a documentary in Calcutta, India about a non-profit organization called Operation Straight Spine while also focusing on differences between private and public healthcare in India. It’s an organization run by orthopedic spinal surgeons who perform life saving surgeries for families who cannot afford the treatment. After filming for two weeks, I flew straight from India to Sydney where I started taking meetings everyday with executives in both film and television– it became very clear they were a little resistant about hiring non-Australian employees because of visa restrictions. Within two weeks of being in Australia, I had to have my appendix removed, which was awesome because it was all free and I stayed in the hospital as long as I needed. PLUS if it had been two weeks earlier, I would have been in India. And if it was two weeks earlier, then I would have been in the U.S. where I had no health insurance whatsoever hahahaha for the win!

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Free healthcare hurts so good.

 

It took me a few months of searching to find a job working in film. I reached out to a friend of mine who knew a veteran Australian actor named Jack Thompson #Legend – HUGE FAN (if you haven’t seen it yet, go watch BREAKER MORANT…now!). I read an article the day before we left to start shooting our CHASING THE WORLD pilot. The article informed me that Jack was producing and starring in a film in Sydney and it started production in a week. As I was waiting to board our flight to Singapore, I made a call to my friend and asked him if there was anything he could do to help me work on the film. He came through big time, and he arranged for Jack Thompson to come and pick me up from my apartment the day I returned from Indonesia. He took me to the set, introduced me to the producers and director, and I was working as an Assistant Director for the rest of the film! From that moment on I had consistent work working in film production (commercials, short films, GREAT GATSBY, etc.).

 

My overall goal was to make industry contacts in Australia and everyone thought it was a pretty daring thing to do, so I was happy that I succeeded. I ultimately decided to move back to the states because I had been trying to find an assistant job working for a producer at a production company while I was down there– I had no luck because of visa sponsorship issues. One of my dream jobs was and STILL is working for Emile Sherman at See-Saw Films!

 

Look for my follow up article about transitioning back to life in the states.

Until then, safe travels and…try to break out of your comfort zone every once in a while – you’ll be thankful for it later.

Patrick AKA The Goo

 

Traveler Spotlight: Kelsey Johnson / “5 Things I’ll Change Next Time I Travel”

KELSEY:

Traveling in many ways is like the ultimate sport.
 

There are time changes to deal with, illnesses to avoid, languages to comprehend. Traveling presents you with a load of physical and mental challenges that you get better with over time. I am no travel pro, but there are a few things I would do differently the next time I travel, minor tweaks I’d make to improve my personal experience.

The 5 Things I Will Change the Next Time I Travel:

5) Be More Physically Adventurous

I’ve never been great at sports so doing athletic activities on holiday has always seemed daunting to me. Before our jungle trek in Bukit Lawang, Indonesia, my stomach was a volcano of roaring nerves. I almost considered staying back but after chatting with the locals I decided to go, and going was one of the best things I’ve ever done. Sure I may have been one of the slower members of our group, but that is actually the reason why I had a crazy chance encounter with a  wild Orangutan (more on that later). Plus, you get the best travel pictures in the  places that take the most work to get to. That being said…
 
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Here I am trekking in the rain in the Sumatran Jungle with cameras following me around. Madness.
 

4) Take More Pictures

I really can’t stand when someone has to pause a trip every few moments to take a photo. Like, “A trash can, wow, let me instagram this– just give me 20min to choose a filter.” My disdain for these people has led me to be someone who avoids taking pictures altogether. That, however, sucks when you get home and have nothing to show for your travels. The next time I travel I want to stop being so cool and embrace my inner tourist. Who cares if you slow down the group for a minute to grab moment. Remember the rule: Pics or it didn’t happen.
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Was this an inappropriate time for an Instagram? Okay, maybe… 🙂

3) Pack Less

There’s a part of me that feels like Occam’s razor rules my life. You know the rule that says that if I don’t pack my dressy gown and motorcycle boots, Brad Pitt is going to show up at my hostel door and offer to take me to an evening gala on the back of his bike. Fortunately/unfortunately this has never been the case. Instead I’ve usually ended up lugging around a giant backpack full of unnecessary outfits and styling tools (oh my god, what if I want to crimp instead of flat iron?). I’ve begun practising the Parisian fashion mindset of bringing a few items that can be styled many ways. I know my back will thank me and I’ll have that extra space for anything new I do pick up along the way.

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The Parisian fashion mindset is all you need.
 

2) Take Myself Less Seriously

It was only towards the end of our trip to Indonesia that I finally decided to get my carefully posed hair wet and let the Afro out. I was so worried about what people would think or how I’d look in pictures, but swimming in a natural waterfall washed all those reservations away, along with the makeup off my face… Traveling is the perfect reason to let go of self consciousness, forget about how you appear, and try new things. Who cares if you don’t get the hang of using chopsticks right off the bat… you will feel like a king when you finally reach your mouth without losing a noodle.
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1) Tell Myself Not to Sweat the Mistakes

Getting lost, running off schedule, and booking sub par accommodations are all a part of the travel experience. Things like this can be especially stressful when you’re traveling in a group or running on a tight budget (or are a plan-obsessed Virgo, like me), but mistakes are also inevitable. There are so many times where I’ve looked back at myself and thought “Man, why was I tripping over that?” Remember what Pumba said.
 

Breathe in: hakuna breathe out: matatta.

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What’s your 20/20 hindsight on traveling? Share your wisdom in the comments!

xo Kels